Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

645231 views
7084 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 11:28 AM

Wans...they've all been around the freight house several times!  Neat question...didn't think it would be a round this long, though.  If they see any joints they just might get it!

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Colorful Colorado
  • 8,639 posts
Posted by Texas Zepher on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 11:19 PM

From a 1936 roster of the Ingersoll-Rand "box cab" type locomotive: 

Central RR. of New Jersey, Bronx Terminal, N. Y., Loco Number 1000, 300HP, 60 tons, Oct. 1925

For some reason it is called a steeple cab. 

Apparently this information is also available in the Train Shed Cylcopedia #43.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 11:33 PM
Johnny, that's right you're up. I think the law was against steam in Manhattan, later amended to include the Bronx and cities that bordered the Bronx. Steam was allowed in the other borroughs, as far as I know. Certainly LIRR ran steam in Queens in the 1940s.

http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/crrnjbxt.html

http://www.port-kelsey.com/?cat=11

Mike

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Thursday, May 21, 2009 6:22 AM

Steam also at Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal and Brooklyn Dock Ry.  Similar freight terminals along the Harlem were Harlem Transfer for the DL&W plus the Erie and LV's yards.

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, May 21, 2009 11:13 AM

What twelve mile short line in Indiana was built by a sewing machine manufacturer becaue it did not like the rate it was paying one Class I railroad, and what other Class I did it build to? It ran an overnight sleeper in conjunction with its new connection. Tiebreaker: name the manufacturer.

Johnny

Johnny

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • 2,535 posts
Posted by KCSfan on Thursday, May 21, 2009 8:25 PM

Johnny,

I believe this would be the New Jersey Indiana & Illinois RR which the Singer Sewing Machine Co. built to access the Wabash from its plant in South Bend, IN. I think the NYC was the road whose freight rates Singer objected to.

Mark

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, May 21, 2009 10:44 PM

KCSfan

Johnny,

I believe this would be the New Jersey Indiana & Illinois RR which the Singer Sewing Machine Co. built to access the Wabash from its plant in South Bend, IN. I think the NYC was the road whose freight rates Singer objected to.

Mark

Mark, you have it! I do not remember just where I learned the details, but I also recall that it was the NYC that irritated the Singer Sewing Machine Company (my mother had one of the foot-powered machines, and I learned to use it. I never did like the electric machines; they went too fast for me). The June, 1916, issue of the Guide shows the line as being 11.6 miles long, and operating two day, daily except Sunday, trains between South Bend and Pine; two connected (from and to) with Wabash #6. The January, 1930 issue shows only full miles, and has only the trains that carried the South Bend-Detroit drawing-room sleeping car.

Mike, again, you have come through with excellent pictures and commentary on the subject of a question. Thanks.

Mark, you should have a question ready by now.

Johnny

Johnny

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Friday, May 22, 2009 5:19 AM

Johnny, thanks for the question. I never got to see that cool 1908 Singer Building or Hudson Terminal, the first skyscraper train station. Singer's New Jersey plant had a GE 50-ton locomotive, later transferred to their Thurso & Nation Valley logging railroad in Quebec. Evidently nowadays it keeps company with a 1919 Central Vermont crane, which my grandfather must have seen when it was brand new.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=54892

http://www.railways.incanada.net/thurso/tnvrthurso2.JPG

http://ovgrs.editme.com/OCR2005

http://www.railways.incanada.net/thurso/tnvrhist.htm

Mike

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Friday, May 22, 2009 7:50 AM

Mike...do you actually own all the neatest pictures in the world?  At least let me nominate you!!

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Friday, May 22, 2009 10:44 AM

wanswheel

That's purty; dig those red counterweights!

Why no connecting rod on the front truck?

I agree with Henry6.

Johnny

 

Johnny

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • 2,535 posts
Posted by KCSfan on Friday, May 22, 2009 6:44 PM

OK here's the next question.

At one time the Salzberg family owned and operated a number of shortlines one of which was the WA&G. Most of these have been long abandoned. Which of the former Salzberg roads was the most profitable and continues to operate today in its entirety and under its original name? Name the RR and its end point terminals.

Mark

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Friday, May 22, 2009 7:36 PM

GOOD SHOW, MARK!

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • 2,535 posts
Posted by KCSfan on Sunday, May 24, 2009 7:40 AM
wanswheel

Mike's nailed this one and it's now his turn to ask the next question.

Mark

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Sunday, May 24, 2009 8:06 AM

I was in the WAG shops when those units were being painted and one stenciled!  Good question, Mark, And, Mike, are there pictures you don't have?!!!

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 16,978 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Monday, May 25, 2009 11:04 AM

The New York Central operated steam into The Bronx on the Putnam untilo about 1949-1950.   And the New Haven had two steam 0-6-0T shop switchers in operation at the Van Ness Bronx electricl locomotive and mu shop until 1956.  Revernue steam on the NYNH&H ended in 1952 in the Boston area.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Monday, May 25, 2009 7:17 PM

Taps

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/19200/19278v.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/13300/13355v.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3c30000/3c32000/3c32700/3c32799v.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/13300/13352v.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3g00000/3g06000/3g06200/3g06266v.jpg

A short line in Arkansas and three in Florida are owned by a company whose president is Harry E. Salzberg's great-grandson. What was the first railroad this company owned, nicknamed the Hoot, Toot & Whistle?

Mike

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Monday, May 25, 2009 9:15 PM
wanswheel

A short line in Arkansas and three in Florida are owned by a company whose president is Harry E. Salzberg's great-grandson. What was the first railroad this company owned, nicknamed the Hoot, Toot & Whistle?

Mike

Everybody should know of the Hoosac Tunnel and Wilmington. It ran north from a junction with the B&M.

Johnny

Johnny

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Monday, May 25, 2009 10:12 PM

Just discussing this same family and empire over dinner this evening (obvious with railfan friend)...and it being so easy with Mark's clues...lets add another question mark if only for extra credit:  What NYC enterprise did they also own?

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 6:54 AM

Johnny, that's right, your turn. I'm guessing H. E. Salzberg regarded HT&W as scrap metal before he sold it to his son-in-law Samuel M. Pinsly. Readsboro, Vermont was the first terminal before the Wilmington extension opened in 1892, and as far north as the tracks went on the 1948 map.

http://middarchive.middlebury.edu/u?/vtpostcards,728

Sam & Company

http://www.pinsly.com/page1127.html

Henry, I think you're referring to former electric transit, the remnants of New York & Queens County Railway and the Steinway Railway that became bus lines.

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 8,156 posts
Posted by henry6 on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 8:19 AM

Ahhh  yes...knew you'd know...I did get to ride the remnant Queensboro Bridge car not too long before its demise.  BTW, the conversation I referred to was in conjunction with the release of an upcoming book on the Unadilla Valley RR.

RIDEWITHMEHENRY is the name for our almost monthly day of riding trains and transit in either the NYCity or Philadelphia areas including all commuter lines, Amtrak, subways, light rail and trolleys, bus and ferries when warranted. No fees, just let us know you want to join the ride and pay your fares. Ask to be on our email list or find us on FB as RIDEWITHMEHENRY (all caps) to get descriptions of each outing.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 10:35 AM

wanswheel
Johnny, that's right, your turn.

This question is about a one-of-a-kind shortline. This road was named for its endpoints--it actually ran between them (it has, comparatively recently, been extended beyond one of them, and now passes through the town in which I grew up). Among other Vice-Presidents, such as "in Charge of White Horse Supply" (W. F. Halsey), "in Charge of the Internal Audit" (Lucius Beebe), it had a "Vice-President in Charge of Unveiling."

Name the railroad, the Vice-President in Charge of Unveiling, and the object unveiled.

I could not tell you how many times I passed by the object.

Johnny

Johnny

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Chicago, Ill.
  • 2,843 posts
Posted by al-in-chgo on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 4:44 PM

That Lucius Beebe, he could sure turn a phrase.  But some of his paragraphs were godawful. 

 

al-in-chgo
  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: At the Crossroads of the West
  • 11,013 posts
Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 10:20 AM
wanswheel
Well, Mike, you got two out of three. If you look at your fourth link, you will see, in the background the object that was publically unveiled--the headquarters building of the L&C. The locomotive in the picture is fouling Lancaster's Main Street; the Southern's Kingville-Rock Hill-Marion line crossed Main Street a little bit north. A few years ago, the L&C bought what was left of this Southern line that was south of Lancaster, adding not quite two-thirds to its length. Thus, the railroad now serves another of the Springs mills, in Kershaw.

As to Springs Park, it was really a nice place in the mid to late forties. I do not remember just what year it was, but our Sunday School teacher took us up there twice. For its size, the railroad gave a nice ride. There were two WWII fighter planes and one WWII bomber there; I do not remember just what they were; we could get into the cockpits and pretend that we were flying them. Another attraction that I remember was a duckpin alley.

I regret that I never did get a copy of the L&C timetable or of the L&C diner menu (if so desired, you could order filet of flounder or floundering filly, along with many other interesting items).

W. F. (Bull) Halsey was in charge of obtaining Emperor Hirohito's white horse to satisfy General Jonathan Wainwright's desire to own it.

Now, how will you amuse us today?

Johnny

Johnny

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 8:38 PM

http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3c10000/3c16000/3c16400/3c16412v.jpg

Five months after Andrew Jackson's ride on the B&O in 1833, who was the second President to ride a train and on what railroad?

Mike

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Colorful Colorado
  • 8,639 posts
Posted by Texas Zepher on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 9:33 PM

wanswheel
Five months after Andrew Jackson's ride on the B&O in 1833, who was the second President to ride a train and on what railroad?

Do you mean who was the person that road a railroad five months after Andrew Jackson....who later became president?   Jackson's term didn't end until 1837, so another president could not have ridden the railroad five months after that be it in 1833 or 1834.....

Van Buren hated railroads and is the one who at one time tried to get them outlawed.  Probably mostly because he was invested in canal companies, but it could have been because he road on one.

My guess would be Polk, he seems a progressive kind of guy.
 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • 4,190 posts
Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 11:51 PM

Actually former President and incumbent Congressman in 1833.

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 16,978 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, May 28, 2009 3:31 AM

Andrew Jackson?

SUBSCRIBER & MEMBER LOGIN

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

FREE NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Get the Classic Trains twice-monthly newsletter