Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, October 18, 2020 4:20 AM

daveklepper
Tenders for as-delivered 600s: Were there only eight 600-607?) compared with J1s 5201 and up as delivered?

My understanding was that all 20 J2s were built with 8-wheel tenders, and that all 'production' J1s were built with some version of the 12-wheel design.  I would in fact have mentioned this if the question had not specifically referenced 5200 as the criterion.

The references I have are a bit unclear; they seem to indicate 12-wheelers were indeed used in'later years' on the B&A, but only after the era of green special paint.  There are pictures of 316K tenders, behind J2s, lettered only "Boston and Albany".

Likewise, to my knowledge all the NYC production locomotives had Baker gear.  Whether there were detail differences between 75" and 79" engines I do not know, but I would suspect that the valve travel and other events would be tied to the stroke, which I think was the same.

This is the first I've heard of Mohawks given smaller tenders.  Presumably these were the very early versions, with higher augment, and the smaller tenders were to let them go someplace where the reduced length and weight were advantages, but the loss of fuel bunkerage was less important.  Here specific references from you would be invaluable.  My lagging in purchasing 'Know thy Mohawks' emerges to savage my tail... Embarrassedo

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:13 AM

The few Mowhaks that had the small tenders had them to handle Bston - Albany passenger trains of heavyweight equipment too heavy for the Hudsons without double heading (usually a Pacific and a Hudson) and fit the turntables easily (comparitive length of the Mowhawks and Berkshires of interest).  The small tenders for the J2s were upon the idea that they were adequate for Boston - Albany without refieling and hauling unnecessary coal uphill costs money.

I was also told that the reason some J2s got larger tenders was for use west of Albany. Yet I did not experience a through ride without an Albany engine change until the diesel era.  I did ride behind the Boston Mowhawks, but I cannot remember what the tender lettering was.  And  they did not go west of Albany.  Wqs this possibly a quick fix until turntables or their operation was modified and the Mowhawks restored to their proper tenders?

Also, I enderstand that some J2s did have small tenders with New York Central lettering initially.  I think Beacon Park Yard Roundhouse maintenance people must have taken care of that pretty quickly.

Look forward to your comments and the next question.

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, October 18, 2020 10:14 AM

Interesting that Mohawk fuel consumption was little greater than Hudson consumption over the run.  Turntable length wasn't something I thought of, precisely because of Berkshires... until I realized that tables in passenger-oriented facilities like South Station might be shorter than those for mainline heavy freight.

Was there sufficient fuel in a 12-wheel tender to take a J2 back across the Berkshires without having to go to Selkirk or wherever to recoal?

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 18, 2020 4:21 PM

I believe the normal practice for B&A passenger power arriving at Alvany was to go to West Albany's facilities, which were older than Selkirk, much closer to the in-city passenger station, and I believe lasted until the end of steam in the area.  I'm not sure there was any attempt to run any steam in any B&A service round-trip without refuling, except Boston-area suburban servicen where it was normal.

But I suspect the 12-wheel tenders could have done that job.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:24 PM

Awaiting your question and any further cimments.

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