Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, July 02, 2018 8:36 PM

Dug into some more timetables to give a better answer.  Milwaukee had three daily Chicago-Omaha trains in 1948, with schedules that might actually have worked for local passengers.  The 1955 "Cities" move left a fleet in each direction, all set up for evening departure from Chicago, and early afternoon arrival from western points, with middle-of-the-night stops in Omaha.  As an interesting footnote, Milwaukee's 1948 Omaha trains had numbers between 102 and 108, all of them used later by "City" or "Challenger" trains.

In 1948 C&NW had 10 trains a day between Chicago and Omaha.  21 and 22, the old "Pacific" still carried an L.A. sleeper (via the Pony Express). In 1957 there were two - daytime 3/4 and overnight (with a 6-6-4 "American" sleeper) 5/6.  The Daytime Kate Shelley 400 between Chicago and Cedar Rapids filled in some of the space on the eastern end.

SP's connection to 21 and 22 had been downgraded to mail trains by 1948.  The through 1948 Overland (27-28) was reduced after 1955 to an Ogden-Oakland train that got sleepers from the City of St. Louis, and further reduced to seasonal by 1960 (SP did rebuild some prewar coaches into domes specifically for the Overland).  The Gold Coast was simply discontinued.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Thursday, July 12, 2018 11:13 AM

New question....

 

There was a passenger train name that was applied to a north-south service that signaled the initial entry of the sponsoring railroad into higher speed services.  Five years later, the same name was applied to an east-west train of another railroad, signaling its entry of a type of service that was trendy at the time.

 

Name, railroads and routes, please. 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, July 13, 2018 4:47 AM

Technically meeting your definitions, but probably not what you are asking for are the Zepjyrs.  The Twin Zephyrs were the CB&Q's entry into the high-speed (for the day) north-south Chicago - Twin Cities market.  Later the name Zephyr, which certainly had become trendy by the itme, was applied to the east-west California Zephyr, which did run on the CB&@, but also on the D&RGW and WP, either one the "other railroad,"    Or you could just wait for the post CZ days for the RGZ, Rio-Grande Zephyr, just one railroad, not including the CB&Q.  With the Zephyr name still "trendy" as in Amtrak's San Francisco Zephyr.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Friday, July 13, 2018 9:51 AM

daveklepper

Technically meeting your definitions, but probably not what you are asking for are the Zepjyrs.  The Twin Zephyrs were the CB&Q's entry into the high-speed (for the day) north-south Chicago - Twin Cities market.  Later the name Zephyr, which certainly had become trendy by the itme, was applied to the east-west California Zephyr, which did run on the CB&@, but also on the D&RGW and WP, either one the "other railroad,"    Or you could just wait for the post CZ days for the RGZ, Rio-Grande Zephyr, just one railroad, not including the CB&Q.  With the Zephyr name still "trendy" as in Amtrak's San Francisco Zephyr.

 

Zephyr is not it.  If you reread my original question I stated that five years separated the two start dates for the trains I'm looking for.  The Twin Cities Zephyr and California Zephyr inauguations were separated by 13 years.  Also, I used "trendy" to refer to the type of service the second train was offering, not to the name itself.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, July 14, 2018 3:44 PM

Not the answer, but an interesting similarity:  CGW and then Wabash Bluebird/Blue Bird (1929 and 1938).  BOTH trains, in this case, were 'restyled' to give streamlined effect from older rolling stock, an approach sometimes taken by large railroads too (B&O and NYC doing this at the same time they were building lightweight equipment).  Not sure how actually fast the CGW Mayo Clinic train was, but it certainly had the potential to be higher-speed than anything else in that area in 1929...

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, July 15, 2018 6:13 AM

Overmod

Not the answer, but an interesting similarity:  CGW and then Wabash Bluebird/Blue Bird (1929 and 1938).  BOTH trains, in this case, were 'restyled' to give streamlined effect from older rolling stock, an approach sometimes taken by large railroads too (B&O and NYC doing this at the same time they were building lightweight equipment).  Not sure how actually fast the CGW Mayo Clinic train was, but it certainly had the potential to be higher-speed than anything else in that area in 1929...

 

Your answer contains a clue in that the trains that comprise the answer I'm looking for were initially equipped with conventional (modernized and not) cars.

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:19 AM

Wouldn't have anything to do with boat trains, would it?

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:55 PM

Overmod

Wouldn't have anything to do with boat trains, would it?

 

Nope...

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 2:21 AM

Did the first train continue to operate during any of the period of operation of the second train?

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:14 AM

daveklepper

Did the first train continue to operate during any of the period of operation of the second train?

 

No - the first train was relatively short lived.  For the second application, the use of the name was eventually expanded by the sponsoring road and was eventually applied to a non-passenger service.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 10:07 AM

So the name is obviously Super as applied to the Super Chief, which introduced new high-speed all First-Class service with diesel power, the first after the CN Beardmores, but first with heavywieght upgraded Pullman equipment, and running east west.  Now I will try and find a short-lived north-south Super passenger rain.

The Super name was later applied by the ATS&F to a high-speed east-west freight service. 

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 11:01 AM

daveklepper

So the name is obviously Super as applied to the Super Chief, which introduced new high-speed all First-Class service with diesel power, the first after the CN Beardmores, but first with heavywieght upgraded Pullman equipment, and running east west.  Now I will try and find a short-lived north-south Super passenger rain.

The Super name was later applied by the ATS&F to a high-speed east-west freight service. 

 

"Super" is obviously not.  

Another clue - both trains shared an endpoint.

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