So Long Charlie Daniels

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  • Member since
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  • From: Henrico, VA
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So Long Charlie Daniels
Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, July 6, 2020 1:36 PM

The "Night Train" came for Charlie today at age 83.  

But instead of thinking of what we've lost, let's remember what we have.

Here's Charlie blowing away "Orange Blossom Special" in his own unforgettable style!  Thanks Charlie!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAZGLXf1TXc  

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 6, 2020 3:26 PM

Quite a fervent patriot too. He loved his America. 

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Posted by scilover on Monday, July 6, 2020 9:50 PM
I just found out about this news this morning and it's such a shame.... He was truly an incredible and talented musician. He will be missed....
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Posted by wjstix on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 11:30 AM

One thing I recall is he was Grand Marshall of the St. Paul Winter Carnival about 15-20 years ago, and went ahead with riding in an open convertible in the parade despite it being the coldest weather ever for the parade...something like -10F IIRC. There was talk about postponing it, but I guess he convinced them to go ahead and he would stick it out.

Stix
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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 4:54 PM

From Mike who served in Vietnam: 

 Still in Saigon

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 9:52 PM

"And in the summer when it rains, I smell the jungle and hear the planes..."

I remember the song well.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 11:24 AM

Thanks for the URL

And:

 

The Great Jazz Day

 

 

 

My copy of this book is a gift from a fellow railfan.  The January 1959 issue of Esquire was devoted to "The Golden Age of Jazz."  On 14 August 1958, Esquire gathered nearly sixty jazz musicians on the stoop, stairs, and sidewalk in front of a West 126th Street Harlem brownstone house for a group photograph published in that issue.  The book comprises the story behind that photograph, related events, biographies of many of the musicians, and related photographs,  All very interesting reading and a great picture of a an era and culture.

 

 

 

It is a train story, because Duke Ellington could not make the date at East 126th Street, and instead was photographed by Art Kane at the front of an "A Train" in the 207th Street, Washington Heights, yards.  This photograph would include if reproducing a photo from a 1959 magazine and a 2000 book is permissible.  It is also on the wall of my apartment in tribute to the Duke's music and in nostalgia for the "8th Avenue Subway," that I rode very frequently when growing up in New York.

 

 

 

But the most important message of the book might be the demonstration of the real brotherly love across ethnic, racial, and religious boundaries, and even professional rivalry, that Jazz produced.  But only five women are represented, two singers, one the woman responsible for the successful movie about the picture A great Day in Harlem, and two others, wives of included men.

 

 

 

The Great Jazz Day, Charles Graham and others, De Capo Press, Woodward Publishing Company, 2000, distributed  by Andrews McMeel Universal, Kansas City, Missouri

 

 

 

Dave, 2 excerpts from an article about Gerry Mulligan, one of the musicians in the 1958 Harlem photo. Also, if you can get Youtube, is Mulligan's "K-4 Pacific."

http://jazzprofiles.blogspot.com/2009/09/gerry-mulligan-part-4.html

 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoB-a3U9jxE

 

"I went to a public school the first year in Kalamazoo. There was a kid who lived across the street who could play trumpet. He could play things like "Carnival of Venice" and "Flight of the Bumble Bee." I was the most envious kid you ever saw. I admired him and we were best friends.

 

 

 

"The next year they sent me downtown to the Catholic school. The school was right next to the Michigan Central tracks. Every day I'd go out for the recess just as the Wolverine was going by. I used to see the people sitting in the dining car, with the white tablecloths and the silverware. The Wolverine was a very classy train on the New York Central. For a long time the Wolverine had the fastest schedule of any train in the country. Those were the Michigan Central tracks, but the Michigan Central was part of the New York Central.  A great train, going by. And here I am in this filthy play-yard in the freezing cold. I was envious then, too."

 

 

 

Another comment:
The Duke's  photo from the book in the hope that you will buy the book..  It's an R-10, accurate for the time.

 

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