1958 "Rescue 8" aired Dec 16, 1958

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1958 "Rescue 8" aired Dec 16, 1958
Posted by NP Eddie on Sunday, May 24, 2020 3:54 PM

All:

I love "You Tube"! This epsiode of "Rescue 8" deals with two young people who try and elope. A UP (probably the City of LA) arrives at Los Angeles. The parents of the girl board a train of X-SP commuter cars only to be in a derailment. The LAcoFD arrives and a rescue man climbs on the cars with a rope a first aid kit and begins to extracate the people. This is twenty years before paramedics. All ends up well and the scene returns to the UP domeliner departing.

Only on TV.

Ed Burns

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, May 24, 2020 4:43 PM

NP Eddie
All:

I love "You Tube"! This epsiode of "Rescue 8" deals with two young people who try and elope. A UP (probably the City of LA) arrives at Los Angeles. The parents of the girl board a train of X-SP commuter cars only to be in a derailment. The LAcoFD arrives and a rescue man climbs on the cars with a rope a first aid kit and begins to extracate the people. This is twenty years before paramedics. All ends up well and the scene returns to the UP domeliner departing.

Only on TV.

Ed Burns

Without the YouTube link you have spun a nice tale.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, May 25, 2020 7:19 AM

BaltACD
Without the YouTube link you have spun a nice tale.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eo-YVJAEjTA

The episode is called "Danger! 20,000 Volts".

Even today with better protective gear and emergency windows it's not easy for emergency crewsto deal with train derailments.

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 12:38 AM

I watched it and it was pretty good by the standards of the time...

Then a program I remember watching live appeared in the "coming up" column.

This was Michael Palin's "Confessions of a Trainspotter"  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYi1qLUAJJI

Forty years later I'm impressed by the clever language (a female signaller was referred to as a "token woman" after she collected a single line token).

The program gives pretty much the history of British Railways in an hour. I'd been to most of the places a few years earlier (I saw the 1975 parade at Shildon, not the 1980 one...) including Kyle of Lochalsh.

It is compulsory to watch the closing credits right to the end (it shows the journey back to London).

Peter

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 11:12 AM

rcdrye
 
BaltACD
Without the YouTube link you have spun a nice tale. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eo-YVJAEjTA

The episode is called "Danger! 20,000 Volts".

Even today with better protective gear and emergency windows it's not easy for emergency crewsto deal with train derailments.

Have been watching some YouTube videos on felling trees and the techniques used to direct their fall - none of which were used when is was necessary to cut down the electric pole 'and have it fall the right way'.  Since when have routine crossarm utility poles carried 20K volts.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 11:32 AM

My family won't let me talk while railroad scenes are showing on TV or in movies.  I'm sure utility guys feel the same about watching power stuff. My read on the insulators would be telephone grade with "109 wire".  My wife and I aren't allowed to comment on medical stuff, either, since both of us have decades of experience as volunteer EMTs.  I have also learned that it's better not to comment on IT foolishness, either.

What I really want to know is how those air-conditioned postwar smooth-side reclining-seat UP cars turned into opening-window SP Harriman arch roof short-haul walkover coaches.  SP had some of those in service until Caltrain received its own cars in the early 1980s, and a bunch are now part of the Grand Canyon Railway's fleet.

They got more of it right with "Emergency!" (1972-1979), clearly at least a bit inspired by "Rescue 8".  It's pretty interesting to look back and see how much has changed in firefighting and other emergency services since then.

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 1:02 PM

And just the stilted, forced nature of the 'acting'.

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 3:32 PM

Quoting rcdrye "What I really want to know is how those air-conditioned postwar smooth-side reclining-seat UP cars turned into opening-window SP Harriman arch roof short-haul walkover coaches.  "

Time warp.Smile

Johnny

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 12:08 AM

BaltACD

 Since when have routine crossarm utility poles carried 20K volts.

 

Quite a few lines around my parts carry 69kV on crossarm utility poles.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, May 29, 2020 12:36 PM

rcdrye
My read on the insulators would be telephone grade with "109 wire". 

Looks to me like dedicated wayside railroad pole line with three-phase on the upper crossarm.  Something outdated that could be cut down as a prop during filming... like the use of the dramatically-placed old car.

I have seen ~9800V on wooden poles/lines, but not more.  I suspect clever use of Tesla coils or the like to simulate the high-tension effects.

Hey, at least they used the subjunctive in the voice-over -- how many TV programs today would even know about that?

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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, June 4, 2020 2:14 PM

M636C
This was Michael Palin's "Confessions of a Trainspotter" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYi1qLUAJJI Forty years later I'm impressed by the clever language (a female signaller was referred to as a "token woman" after she collected a single line token). The program gives pretty much the history of British Railways in an hour. I'd been to most of the places a few years earlier (I saw the 1975 parade at Shildon, not the 1980 one...) including Kyle of Lochalsh.

I remember that show, it was one episode of a series BBC did taking mostly older British folks (primarily journalists as I recall) and having them tour the railroads in a foreign country or continent. Most of them were IIRC rather pompous and condescending towards the locals, particularly in South America and India. But then, Michael Palin did the episode on the U.K. and had some great comments..."it was on this strech the British Rail set one of it's many records, that of the largest amount ever "lifted" (i.e., "stolen") from a train". Based on this success, Palin began a long second career as a TV tour host, travelling thru the world.

Stix
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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, June 4, 2020 7:04 PM

Overmod

 

 
rcdrye
My read on the insulators would be telephone grade with "109 wire". 

 

Looks to me like dedicated wayside railroad pole line with three-phase on the upper crossarm.  Something outdated that could be cut down as a prop during filming... like the use of the dramatically-placed old car.

I have seen ~9800V on wooden poles/lines, but not more.  I suspect clever use of Tesla coils or the like to simulate the high-tension effects.

Hey, at least they used the subjunctive in the voice-over -- how many TV programs today would even know about that?

 

One can wonder how much is taught concerning communicating intelligibly. 

Johnny

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