Columbia

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Columbia
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, April 26, 2020 11:30 PM
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 27, 2020 3:43 PM

Columbia University still has a sailing club, but not at that old location anymore.

Too bad, that was a classy-looking old building.  Probably dissolved into the Hudson when the river got nasty.

Anyway, here's the current club.  http://www.columbiasailing.org  

Know who Columbia claims as their most famous drop-out?  Alexander Hamilton!

He was a student there when it was called King's College, and when the American Revolution broke out he went of to fight as an artillery officer.  He never went back for a degree, but when the school was renamed "Columbia" in 1784 he did wind up on the board of trustees. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, April 27, 2020 4:36 PM

Columbia's sailing club lost its access in the 1930s, when Robert Moses was building the West Side Highway ("grade crossing elimination structure") with federal and New York state money.  He didn't like Columbia, despite having a Columbia PhD in Political Science.  The sailing club offered to pay the whole cost of retaining access, but Moses blocked it.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:24 AM

I was actually afraid to row on the Hudson back in my 'college years' -- or, with my sometimes errant sailing 'skill', to take something like a Laser out on it, lest  I have a dip.  Things have changed in water quality since then.  

I do find this makes me wish I were still up there:

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 8:38 AM

I read about that "Hamilton-Burr" yacht competition on the club website, Columbia vs. Princeton, the respective alma maters  of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.

I'd hope there's no gunfire involved. 

Interesting, the 48 star pattern on the 1927 jack in the club flag sheet, the rows of stars being offset intead of neatly stacked on top of one another as is typical for the 48 star US flag and jacks of the time.  I've heard of these variations but have never been able to find an explanation for the same. 

 

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Posted by seppburgh2 on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 7:35 PM

If you're interested in the statue Le Marteleur (The Hammerman.)  It was a gift of the class of 1889 that was installed in 1914.  Now, in looking at his "safety gear" and long wrench he is leaning on one can almost figure out his job.  I point this out as it becomes difficult to view a common 1880's workmen and related it back to today.  While we can look back on the "stuff" from 135 years ago, we don't have a feel for the people who used them, what they thought, what they accomplished with it.  Just my two cents on the Hammer Man.  To dive deeper, click over on over:

https://blogs.cul.columbia.edu/outdoorsculpture/2018/08/30/constantin-meunier-and-le-marteleur/

 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 8:36 PM

Great Post! Thank you seppburh2.  Now part of my curriculum. 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 9:49 PM
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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 4:30 PM

Could not tell much about the sculpture pictures untiil:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 4:40 PM

But now that they are posted, they can be erased from my hard drive.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 7:10 PM

daveklepper

But now that they are posted, they can be erased from my hard drive.

 

Somehow I doubt any net police will be banging on your door.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 11:21 PM
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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, April 30, 2020 8:13 AM

Actually, what worried me, was the thought that "others" might think "Miner with Lantern" verged on Ponography.  But inspectin of the improved photo indicates this miner does indeed have his pants on.  So I'll keep the ones I've posted and add this:

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 30, 2020 10:01 AM

Interesting painting, "The Black Country."

When I think of France heavy industry isn't the first thing that comes to mind, but  as a modern sophisticated country of course they had it, and still do.  

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, May 2, 2020 7:14 PM

Of course, when you said "Columbia" I thought of the 2-4-2 that got me started.  Wink

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 2, 2020 7:25 PM

"Columbia, The Gem Of The Carpet!"  

Who knows how many got started into model railroading and toy trains in general thanks to those inexpensive little Lionels?

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