Steam Locomotives in Australia

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Steam Locomotives in Australia
Posted by M636C on Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:12 AM

Two videos were referenced in a local forum.

Locomotive 3801 has been returned to service after around a decade and there was some concern as to whether its whistle sound was correct. I myself think it blast is too sharp compared to the normal service sound.

These videos were taken by Phil Belbin, who I met in September 1962.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PzDFh9Ue8s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VRGdocqY7E

Another collection from Phil Belbin's son includes a number of scenes at Redfern, the station I used to go to university.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7hUVPAmiVI

A few scenes appear in both sets, the shot of 3810 working the official train for the opening of the Hawkesbury River Bridge in 1946 show a new locomotive and is the only colour record of the day and the actual colours of the train carriages which were soon repainted.

Apart from the shots before I was born, much of the content is familiar to me.

I don't think I saw the Royal Train of 1954, but saw some of it on display in 1955 for the Railway Centenary. I did see the Queen in her parade through the city, of course.

Peter

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Posted by NorthWest on Thursday, February 20, 2020 10:06 AM

Thanks!

Lots of straight-boilered C36s around in the last video...

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, February 20, 2020 12:07 PM

Very enjoyable. North American steam could easily have been around for another decade, you did it right not bankrupting yourselves buying expensive Diesels and pretending it's saving you tons of money. 

 Have to duck now, here come the pies being thrown at me, along with a few rotten tomatoes. 

Anyway thanks for posting ... Australia did it correctly! 

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:24 PM

NorthWest

Thanks!

Lots of straight-boilered C36s around in the last video...

 

I think the first Belpaire boiler was only installed in a 36 in 1953.

However, there is the "railfan effect" in operation. The locomotive on the turntable is 3663 which was one of two that never received the Belpaire boiler and was withdrawn with the original boiler (which received a new steel firebox in 1934).

All the 2-8-2s carried "Baldwin Lima Hamilton" plates and significantly post date C&O 1309.

Peter

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Posted by NorthWest on Thursday, February 20, 2020 8:31 PM

It was interesting to see the D59s on passenger trains. I assumed they were mainly used on goods workings.

Altogether, the number of locations I recongize is higher than expected...

 

Would've been nice if they could've saved a round-boiler C36 (or, even better, a CR C).

The last B-L-H steam was the 50 WG 2-8-2s for India in 1955, less than a year from the end (I think).

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Posted by M636C on Friday, February 21, 2020 3:22 PM

NorthWest

It was interesting to see the D59s on passenger trains. I assumed they were mainly used on goods workings.

Altogether, the number of locations I recongize is higher than expected...

 

Would've been nice if they could've saved a round-boiler C36 (or, even better, a CR C).

The last B-L-H steam was the 50 WG 2-8-2s for India in 1955, less than a year from the end (I think).

 

The D59s were used on passenger trains to some of the workshops in the Sydney suburbs basically for the use of employees. These included the Chullora workshops and Enfield locomotive depot both of which were on lines without regular passenger service. I went out once to get these trains but the one I saw had a 41 class diesel transfer unit. It is the only photo I have of a 41 on a passenger.

There were a lot of 36 class Belpaire boilers built (105 were ordered, enough to fit to most of the 35 class as well although none were fitted). There are a number of these available for any preserved 36 class. It might be possible to fit one with a 1934 round top firebox since the boiler barrel was unchanged.

This would allow the older design to be represented. The frame of a C class tender was kept for years in Port Augusta converted to a heavy load flat wagon. There is a D58 tender body in good condition in Canberra.

There is a CR L class 2-8-2 tender at Port Augusta. This could be coupled to a D59 to represent a CR steam locomotive, particularly if the original smokebox front were fitted.

Peter

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, February 21, 2020 6:34 PM

It is great to see 3801 back in steam.  That engine has as much national significance as the Flying Scotsman, or our Royal Hudson.

Australia's railroad system has always seemed to me to be an interesting blend of British and North American stuff.

Of course, we never had Garratts over here.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by NorthWest on Friday, February 21, 2020 7:20 PM

Good ideas.

At this point I'd take 3642 operating more regularly, though.

It is certainly nice to have 3801 back, and it will look great when painted.

Maybe 3830 will join it eventually.

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, February 21, 2020 9:22 PM
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Posted by M636C on Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:43 AM

The first three photos are of the Victorian Railways broad gauge Royal train.

I didn't get to Melbourne for nine years after that operated.

Miningman
Posted by M636C on Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:12 AM

 

...I don't think I saw the Royal Train of 1954...

 

 
The train on display in Sydney in September 1955 included one of the blue RSC-3s (seen in the third video I listed earlier) and the car in the photo below which dated to 1901, the date of Federation, and was known as "GG" with no number (for Governor-General - it was built for the first Governor-General the Queen's Australian representative and an authority above the state Governors, also Royal representatives). GG is of course preserved as were two other cars in that train. Several of the cars in the Victorian train are preserved.
 

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:38 PM
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Posted by M636C on Saturday, February 22, 2020 7:32 PM

Miningman

I'm pleased that I didn't have to stand in the rain to watch the Royal Train.

Both of those photos are north of Sydney in reverse order on the same trip. The upper is at Wyong, looking north. The station has the same platforms but with new buildings now. There was then no shelter for the children on the island platform.

I think the lower photo is at Thornleigh, although so much has changed since 1954 it is hard to be certain.

4001 has been returned to the blue colour it had during the Royal Tour and is in working order. 4002 is still complete but somewhat remote in Karratha.

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, February 23, 2020 1:55 PM

M636C
I'm pleased that I didn't have to stand in the rain to watch the Royal Train.

But Eliza would have said different to 'Enry, wouldn't she?

Mercifully, I don't feel a song coming on ... but to have sain the train of the Quain in the rain would sca(i)rcely have bain a pain.

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, February 23, 2020 7:26 PM

Overmod

 

 
M636C
I'm pleased that I didn't have to stand in the rain to watch the Royal Train.

 

But Eliza would have said different to 'Enry, wouldn't she?

Mercifully, I don't feel a song coming on ... but to have sain the train of the Quain in the rain would sca(i)rcely have bain a pain.

 

As it was, I watched the parade down George Street from the roof of the office building in which my father worked (on a bright fine day). While this was quite safe, the roof was flat and there was a substantial stone balustrade around the edge (which I had to be lifted up to see over) there was a substantial cooling plant just behind me. I don't think the concept of legionnaire's disease was known in 1954 but I came down with a cold afterwards.

I'm told I sound more like Eliza after Henry Higgins' training than before. For some reason this effect is greatest when I'm talking to someone from Glasgow. I can only assume that because I'm struggling to understand a strange accent I unintentionally try to speak more clearly. My paternal grandfather was from Aberdeen, where the locals can't understand the Glasgow accent (as I found during a visit).

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, February 23, 2020 9:35 PM

Good to see streamlined-steam locomotives were still alive and kicking in a developed country during the mid-1960s. Most of my favorite streamlined-steam engine in NA had their plating removed faster than light.

VR's S Class is one of my favorite streamliners in the Asia-Pacific, the "Kantola-streamlining-style" shrouding looked much better on the S class mainly due to the higher position of the headlight, compared them with the NYCRR's Commodore Vanderbilt. I think the headlight on the steam engine is like the eyes of a human. 

 

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