USA Thanksgiving

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USA Thanksgiving
Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 4:43 PM

From Mike: Entitled: What? 

 

What?
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 5:45 PM

That's a nice old Currier and Ives print, and there were darn few American homes in the 19th Century that didn't have one or two hanging on the walls.

It sure makes a nice Thanksgiving card from Mike, doesn't it?

Thanks Mike (Wanswheel), and thanks Vince for passing it on!

And Happy Thanksgiving all!

PS:  We'll be heading up to Pennsylvania tomorrow for Thanksgiving at Lady Firestorm's sisters place.  Ah yes, turkey, some wine anilhilation with my drinkin' buddies Stephanie and Janine (we'll see if they can keep up with Uncle Wayne) and a raid on Hennings Trains in Lansdale!  Perfect weekend!  The computer's staying home, although if the hotel guest computer is amenable I might check in from time to time.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 7:51 PM

Big storms at both ends of this holiday's travel suggest that the Canadians may have had a reason to celebrate the holiday in October.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 8:48 PM

The earliest it can be is Oct 8th, the latest Oct. 14th. Trees are at peak colour, Fall Fairs everywhere celebrating the harvest, yeah it's a nice time of the year. 

When the aliens from space invade they will eat those 'tasty Canadians' first. 

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Posted by L. Zhou on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 8:55 PM

The painting looks great, I believe I have seen it before, but I don't know quite where.

Turkey and stuffing, anyone? 

 

Sometimes, it's just luck. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, November 28, 2019 6:23 PM

Miningman
When the aliens from space invade they will eat those 'tasty Canadians' first.

Yeah, maybe.  But American bacon has more fat!  Wink

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, November 29, 2019 7:24 AM

Penny Trains
 
Miningman
When the aliens from space invade they will eat those 'tasty Canadians' first.

 

Yeah, maybe.  But American bacon has more fat!  Wink

 

Yeah, keeps you goin'.  General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia lost when the ran out of that good Southern bacon!

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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, November 29, 2019 10:43 AM

Flintlock76

 

 
Penny Trains
 
Miningman
When the aliens from space invade they will eat those 'tasty Canadians' first.

 

Yeah, maybe.  But American bacon has more fat!  Wink

 

 

 

Yeah, keeps you goin'.  General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia lost when the ran out of that good Southern bacon!

 

Yes; General Lee was unable to patrol the Richmond and Danville, and thus a supply train was captured. I have the impression that the Army of Northern Virginia did receive rations from that train after the surrender.

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, November 30, 2019 7:50 AM

Quite true Johnny.  Custer's cavalry captured the supply train at Apomattox Station before Lee's men could get to it.  Grant released the train and it's cargo of rations after the surrender.

Wayne

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Posted by Fr.Al on Saturday, November 30, 2019 12:16 PM

I bet they didn't get any coffee, either. To me, that's even worse than going without bacon. As a gun enthusiast, you've probably seen the Sharps rifle with the coffee grinder in the stock.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, December 1, 2019 9:22 PM

Fr.Al

I bet they didn't get any coffee, either. To me, that's even worse than going without bacon. As a gun enthusiast, you've probably seen the Sharps rifle with the coffee grinder in the stock.

 

Oh, I've seen those coffee-grinder Sharps carbines alright, but only in museums.  Those in private hands very rarely surface on the collector market.  Actually, they were a scarce item even during the Civil War.

Soldiers on both sides were absolutely crazy about coffee, one writing home "The amount of coffee consumed by the army would astound you!"  When both Union and Confederate armies were camped in close proximity to each other frequently a "black market" woud spring up, Yankees trading coffee to the Rebs for tobacco, and vice versa. 

There was even an "instant" coffee developed for issue to the Union troops.  It was a paste that came in a can, and had sugar and powdered milk mixed in.  Just add hot water and presto!  Hot coffee, light n' sweet!

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, December 1, 2019 10:31 PM

Flintlock76

There was even an "instant" coffee developed for issue to the Union troops.  It was a paste that came in a can, and had sugar and powdered milk mixed in.  Just add hot water and presto!  Hot coffee, light n' sweet!

Add some hard tack and you've got a pretty original MRE!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, December 2, 2019 8:47 PM

MRE's, otherwise known as "Meals Rejected by Everybody!"

Actually they're a bit after my time.  When I was in the Corps we still had C-Rations.  There was a bit of a throw-back to the hardtack days in the C-Rat packs, a can of large, thick crackers that resembled round oversized Saltines.  We called them "John Wayne Crackers."   I used to crumble them up in the leftover juices in the meat ration cans and eat them that way.

Interestingly, Civil War soldiers did the same thing with hardtack.  They'd crumble it into the bacon or pork fat in their mess kits and re-heat it before eating it.  They called it "skilligalee."  

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 4:50 PM

Yeah, Civil War rations could be pretty lousy (depending on what you're used to) but at least on the Union side there was usually plenty to go around.

At the end of the war a surrendered Confederate soldier looked up at a Union cavalryman and said...

"My Lord, your uniform looks so new, your boots look first-rate, your guns are so good, your horse looks so healthy, and you look like your bowels is so regular!"

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 11:34 PM

Obviously the worms didn't just live in the hardtack back then....

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Fr.Al on Wednesday, December 4, 2019 2:39 PM

Well, coffee is great for keeping a person regularBig Smile .Had the Johnny Rebs been able to add Cuba to their country, they might have been able to get their hands on coffee. I'm not sure about Cuba, but I've sampled decent coffee from nearby Haiti.

     As far as Sharps firearms, I believe only twelve of the Coffee Grinder carbines exist. My late father claimed to have owned some later type of Sharps rifle. 

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, December 4, 2019 4:12 PM

Coffee from Cuba might have had that chickpea addition to go with 'traditional' chicory in Southern "coffee".  Bah!

I have to wonder if the Arbuckle 'innovation' of using sugar and egg as an antiburning coating came out of Civil War (and perhaps Southern, considering the sugar) practice... it's certainly something that could be related to the Starbuck's people; they evidently need it.

Every report of people attempting to actually grind coffee in one of these things is negative.  Apparently the feed slot is not sized to accept an as-roasted bean, and the mill doesn't grind freshly-roasted beans well.  That argues strongly that this was (as indicated) for grinding parched corn or other meal.  I see armchair Civil War enthusiasts making much of the idea that where there's corn, there will be grist mills to commandeer ... that does not jibe well with units in the field carrying dried whole kernels or other grain...

Oh, and apparently there were a bunch of these things 'modified' starting in the early '60s from a stash of 'found parts'.  I am not sure how easily one of these could be distinguished from an original.

Meanwhile, there is the weapon Lincoln called the "Coffee Mill Gun" -- a decidedly different thing from a burr grinder in a stock!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 4, 2019 6:50 PM

The Agar "Coffee Mill Gun," also know as the Union Repeating Gun.

Here's a replica (built by the shooter) in action.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcsviX3clZU  

A contemporary of the more famous Gatling gun.  Not bad, but not as good as the Gatling.

Here's the whole story for those interested...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agar_gun  

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