Spadina and John St Roundhouses 1930s Aerial View

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Spadina and John St Roundhouses 1930s Aerial View
Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 01, 2019 4:34 PM

CNR's Spadina Roundhouse and CPR's John St. Roundhouse 1930's view from on high.

CPR's John St Roundhouse is now a 17 acre railpark complex with a brewery, Steam Whistle Brewery, and a restaurant and entertainment complex. Also CNR 6213 is there.

CNR Spadina Roundhouse long gone. Now the CN Tower and Sky Dome ( Rogers Centre) home of the Blue Jays. 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, August 01, 2019 9:39 PM

In the mid 1980s I remember seeing a large roundhouse from the CN tower.  Which one would that have been?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, August 01, 2019 9:43 PM

Wow!  Is that impressive or what?

Makes me feel like singing...

"Nothin' could be finer than to be there in Spadina in the Thir-ir-ir-ties..."   Wink

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, August 01, 2019 10:09 PM

Nothin' could be sweeter than to fix a superheater; it's not diiiir ... tee...

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 01, 2019 10:30 PM

Midland Mike-- That would be CPR John St Roundhouse 

This is the view you saw but more developed and recent.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Roundhouse_Park_Toronto.jpg

Roundhouse Park Toronto.jpg

Roundhouse Park viewed from the CN Tower

 

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Posted by cx500 on Friday, August 02, 2019 10:44 PM

In the original picture, notice at the bottom the full tracks at the CN and CP (lower) freight sheds.  Traffic was obviously good.  At the top, I think most if not all of the water area has subsequently been reclaimed with fill, and the present waterfront is out of the picture.  And in turn the newer dock area and sheds is now condos.

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Posted by NP Eddie on Saturday, August 03, 2019 6:57 PM

What were the two adjacent roundhouses used for?

The photo is great.

Ed Burns

Retired Clerk from Northtown (Minneapolis)

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, August 03, 2019 10:27 PM

NP Eddie: They were located at Union Station, Toronto, along with the coach yards and a lot of freight handling. Many passenger trains both East and West originated at Union Station. A wide variety of steam was looked after, one Canadian Pacific and the other Canadian National. 

CPR's John St Roundhouse was known for its meticulous and spotless appearance of its passenger steam power, Hudsons, Jubilees , Pacifics.

CNR housed Northerns, Mountains, and Pacifics for passenger. Both of course housed smaller power, 4-6-0's, switchers, Consolidations and Moguls. 

Building the Gardiner Expressway and the footprint of the CN Tower

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CN Tower site
 
The CNR Roundhouse is top right in the photo and is now gone. That is were the Toronto Blue Jays play ball now, (the SkyDome). 
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, August 04, 2019 3:46 PM
The Toronto Harbour Commission Building.
 
The Toronto Harbour Commission Building was once right on the water in downtown Toronto.
 
 
Note Submarine.
 
Ice Boats.
 
 
 
Landfill surrounded the building.
 
 
And it now is lost in the midst of Downtown TO.
 
 
It is said when they were excavating for the TTC streetcar route into Union Station from the South
a cannon from a sailing war ship was found.
 
 
TTC entrance to Union Station, Looking East.
 
 
TTC PCC Union.
 
 
Toronto Union, Long ago.
 
 
More.
 
 
Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, August 04, 2019 4:25 PM
Montreal and Southern Counties Station, Montreal.
 
Another building swallowed by the passage of Time and Progress? is the once
M&SC station in Montreal.
 
View looking north. M&SC Yard and Station on NE Corner. 1948.
 
 
First Station.
 
 
 
Interurban Service to downtown Montreal came off in 1955 so that their RoW on downstream side of Victoria Bridge could be converted to automobiles.
 
 
M&SC Train from Montreal arriving St. Lambert. East End Stn.
 
 
 
 
 
M&SC Car passing under CNR St. Lambert outward bound.
 
 
 Google View.
 
Anyway, The Interurbans left, The wire came down, BUT the Station survived!
 
Now almost lost amongst redevelopment in downtown Montreal.
 
 
FWIW.
 
There is a photo of D.P. Morgan, Remember him? standing inside this station with the sun streaming in the west windows. The Regulator Clock on the wall between the windows is badged M&SC.
 
Thank You.

 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, August 04, 2019 4:52 PM

Why built on the waterfront pushing it back when the city had lots of room North, East and West? They did a swell job of it all over the years except for the Gardiner Expressway which cut everything off. Plans now to make it gone! 

M&SC now a Pizza Shop. What a legacy that is. At least it's still standing but few will remember or know. DPM and the Regulator Clock gone too. 

The arrow of time only points one way, for us anyway. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, August 04, 2019 6:59 PM

Interesting story behind that submarine.

It's a German minelaying-capable sub from World War One, surrendered to the US Navy after the war and used for Liberty Bond tours.

Here's the story...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_UC-97  

They found a cannon while building the TTT streetcar line?  I'm not really surprised.  Worn-out iron guns were considered unfit for melting down and recasting, so many of them wound up as ship's ballast, hitching posts, and landfill.  The last time we were in Placentia NFLD there was a small field on the outskirts of town that had old Royal Navy iron cannon just laying around.  They were too big to fit in a suitcase, otherwise there'd be one less of them up there!  Whistling

Here's a really wild cannon story.  Back in the 1970's there was road bridge repair work being done in upstate New York, and the crew working on the foundations for the new bridge uncovered a British cannon abandoned by Burgoyne's army in 1777! 

In 1978 some Revolutionary War re-enactors (Royal Artillery, natch!) were putting it to good use!  I know, I saw it!

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Posted by NDG on Monday, August 05, 2019 10:39 AM
Submarine UC 97
 
The further these threads diverge, the more interesting Data that is found!
 
Thank You, Sirs.
 
Never heard a word before about the WW I Submarine UC 97!!!
 
That is a good-sized US Navy??? tug along side.
 
 
 
What is also worth noting was that the ' USS Willmette ' sent out to sink UC 97 in Lake Michigan was once the Great Lakes Passenger Steamer ' SS Eastland ' which capsized at it's dock in Chicago with the loss of over 800 lives.
 
 
To raise the ' Eastland ' the heavy Salvage tug ' Favorite ' was brought in to assist.
 
 
 it in itself a curious creation with two funnels, side by side, and a large crane on the foredeck.
 
The ' SS Favorite ' too had an interesting life in Civilian and Navy life, then went to Peru.
 
 
 
 
 
After WW II, U-505 was moved to Chicago where it now resides.
 
 
 
My Father and I went down to see it transit the Lachine Canal.
 
 
The photo of DPM inside the M&SC Station, Montreal is on the Internet, I have seen it
there in the last year or so, but neglected to capture it.
 
The photo was in ' Trains ' magazine in the Sixties.
 
Thank You, to all.
 
P.S.
 
Have to love the Camouflage on the ' Favorite '
 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, August 05, 2019 5:32 PM

NDG
... the Great Lakes Passenger Steamer 'SS Eastland' which capsized at its dock in Chicago with the loss of over 800 lives.

This the evil counterpart to the Britannic.  The latter proved the worth of the rush to install plenty of lifeboats after the Titanic disaster; the Eastland proved they could be an aggravating factor.

The ship was noted for behaving top-heavily at times only a few years after it was launched (as I recall, as a banana boat carrying a comparatively small 'movable load' of passengers.  See the relevant scene from Circus World for the 'other' part of the problem that did all those people on the Eastland in...

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, August 05, 2019 5:35 PM

Unbelievable, sickening and bewildering story on the roll over of the Eastland and 800 lives lost, in 20 feet of water, 20 feet from shore and immediate rescue. What a tragedy.

On the Harbour Commision Building finding itself in the heart of the city without being moved: walk up to anyone in those cars or along the sidewalk and explain to them that a WWI German submarine was right here, in the water! They would assume you are a nutbar!

Here's the story of the Gardiner Expressway sent to me from Mike. There has been for some time now serious consideration for tearing it down. 

Thinking other great cities cut off areas by putting in some kind of expressway, even from their own waterfronts. No easy solution now as to where to put the redirected highway.


How the Gardiner got built

 

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, August 06, 2019 2:45 PM

My, Mr. Gardiner looks formidable!    However, sometimes when something needs to be done in a big city you need a guy to do it who doesn't just intimidate his inferiors, but his superiors as well.  It's a gift few men have.

Mr. Gardiner certainly looks like he fit that category!  

 

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Posted by Backshop on Tuesday, August 06, 2019 7:37 PM

Speaking of navy ships on the Great Lakes, I remember as a kid 50+ years ago going on a tour of the USS Amhert (PCER-853).  It was docked, along with a couple of submarines, on the Detroit River across from Belle Isle.  It was commissioned in 1944 and served until 1970.  I just did some research and discovered that she was transfered to South Vietnam and escaped to the Philippines with the Communist takeover.  She served in the Philippines Navy until 2010.  Quite a long and interesting career.

PS -While on the Lakes, her and several other vessels trained reservists and were known as the Corn Belt Navy.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, August 06, 2019 10:15 PM

Backshop : Turns out it was built by Pullman Standard!

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/vbAAAOSw0e9UzBeY/s-l1600.jpg

 

I

 

“The grimmest of all wartime shipboard duty was experienced by the valiant medical corpsmen who manned the PCE (R) rescue ships the Naval equivalent of seagoing ambulances.” http://415vva.homestead.com/Mil_Hist_-_WWII_PCE_R_s.pdf

 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, August 08, 2019 9:58 PM

Imagine that, a Pullman that floats.

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, August 08, 2019 10:52 PM

Have to admit I did not know that, or if I did it, its long forgotten. Truly impressive on Pullman's part. 

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