Baldwin Steam Locomotives for Export

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Baldwin Steam Locomotives for Export
Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 6:44 PM

I found some pics of Indian locomotive class WP from rrmuseumpa. 116 out of 755 of these streamlined locomotives were built by Baldwin from 1947 - 1949, another 300 were built in Canada from 1949 - 1959. Light Pacific for passenger trains with 67 inches drivers, capable of reaching 68mph. TE was 30600lbf, power output was 2680dbhp at 74mph(est.). No mechanical stokers, probably not equipped with roller bearings. (correct me if I am wrong)

This was not the first time Baldwin export steam locomotive to India; other orders in the same period were 33 S118 class locomotives and 253 (?)2-8-2 MacArthur dual-gauge engines in three gauges. (according to americasteamlocomotive.com) I am not familiar with India's railroad history, your contribution is very much appreciated!Thumbs Up

These were some substantial overseas orders for Baldwin during the era of steam locomotive's demise in the States. Chesapeake & Ohio 2-6-6-2 Mallet was the last 10 domestic steam locomotives built by Baldwin in 1948 for America at the same time period. I guess these were some of the largest orders for Baldwin after the 50 PRR T1 ordered in 1944.

Many third-world countries, from the Southeast of Mediterranean Sea to the West of Pacific Ocean, kept using steam locomotives until the late-1980s. If there was another new buyer had the same demand like India, Baldwin might have lasted a bit longer. But once these third-world countries learned how to make steam locomotive themselves, steam locomotive manufacturer like Baldwin and Alco would still have hit the same dead-end.  

All pictures without additional credit are non-copyrighted material from Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania and were touched up by me for better quality.

 

 .

 

(to be continued)

 (to be continued)

 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 7:01 PM

Wow!  How'd you like to be a passenger on this ship!

Is it just me, or does the loco closest to the camera have a "comb over headlight" like a Dreyfuss Hudson?

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 7:42 PM

I don't think so, looks more like the combination of light and shadow gives that impression.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 7:44 PM

Penny Trains

Wow!  How'd you like to be a passenger on this ship!

Is it just me, or does the loco closest to the camera have a "comb over headlight" like a Dreyfuss Hudson?

No worries, Penny Trains! these machines wouldn't be sweating even though the cargo hold was packed like sardines! But the smell of the fresh primer might made people felt dizzy if the door of the cargo hold was closed!Smile

It probably took the ship more than one month to travel from the States to India. If I was a crew on this ship, I would have slept inside the cab of these locomotives firebox or smokebox if they were not blocked. If I got fired for this, I will leave the ship and worked as a steam train engineer until 1970s! Cool 

I can't see the comb over headlight thing you mentioned. I think it was the shadow makes the engine you see looks different. Speaking of Dreyfuss Hudson, I wonder how the work shop in India would have painted and decorated the Hudsons with their unique India styling. : )

The ship used to take these Baldwin products to India.

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 7:46 PM

Baldwin locomotives were exported to many British Dominions after the Columbian Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876.

Three Australian states had locomotives simiar to those exhibited delivered by 1879 and many other locomotives followed.

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 7:58 PM

M636C
Baldwin locomotives were exported to many British Dominions after the Columbian Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876.

Three Australian states had locomotives simiar to those exhibited delivered by 1879 and many other locomotives followed.

Peter

Thanks, Peter. This is a drawing of a CRNJ 4-4-0 at the Philadelphia Exhibition in 1876:

https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Im1876ev22-p104a.jpg

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, December 04, 2018 8:55 PM

Penny Trains
Is it just me, or does the loco closest to the camera have a "comb over headlight" like a Dreyfuss Hudson?

That locomotive is like the other ones; what you see is the shadow of the beam immediately above.  (Like the cool "paint job' on Mr. Klepper's ART reefer picture on the other thread...)

Perhaps the greatest export triumph for Baldwin was the power built for the Wellington and Manawatu in New Zealand.

 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Wednesday, December 05, 2018 5:59 AM

Overmod

Perhaps the greatest export triumph for Baldwin was the power built for the Wellington and Manawatu in New Zealand.

I learned something "new" today!Coffee

Source:Wiki

If you are talking about the NZR OA and OC class, I agree that their TE figures were compelling for export engines used in New Zealand. 13,175 lbf for OA class,  15,110 lbf for OC class. Another two was NZR UD class built in 1904, TE was 15,280 lbf. I think I need to invest some more time in early steam locomotives!

( Missed the NZR Q class (1901),  "the first locomotives in the world to be built with the wheel arrangement of 4-6-2", TE was 18,340 lbf )

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, December 05, 2018 6:43 AM

Overmod

 

 
Penny Trains
Is it just me, or does the loco closest to the camera have a "comb over headlight" like a Dreyfuss Hudson?

 

That locomotive is like the other ones; what you see is the shadow of the beam immediately above.  (Like the cool "paint job' on Mr. Klepper's ART reefer picture on the other thread...)

Perhaps the greatest export triumph for Baldwin was the power built for the Wellington and Manawatu in New Zealand.

The Wellington and Manawatu certainly had interesting locomotives, and the last two 4-6-0s, 19 and 20, NZR class Ud were quite impressive.

But the NZR had many more Baldwin locomotives than the W&M, the two classes of Baldwin Pacific, the Q and Aa totalled 23, more locomotives than the W&M ever owned. There were twenty Ub class ten wheelers from Baldwin which, while not as large or fast as the Uds, lasted much longer and earned their keep.

The W&M was a private railway and had a measure of support from those who opposed Government ownership.

But Baldwin earned more from the NZR, and the Q as one of the first true Pacifics was more influential than anything on the W&M.

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Wednesday, December 05, 2018 7:20 AM

I just read about the world's first true Pacific 4-6-2: NZR Q Class (1901). It is a surprise to me that the first Pacific was built for NZR. Wiki says Baldwin Built 111 steam locomotives for NZR and the WMR since 1879. But British companies were the top suppliers all along. Coffee

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, December 06, 2018 7:57 PM

 

I found some pics of Indian locomotive class WP from rrmuseumpa. 116 out of 755 of these streamlined locomotives were built by Baldwin from 1947 - 1949, another 300 were built in Canada from 1949 - 1959.

 

 

Looking at the first three photographs, two distinct versions of the locomotive can be seen. The first and third photos represent locomotives 7200 to 7215 built in 1947 The second photo represents the "production" locomotives built in 1949 numbered from 7216 upward.

 

The first batch, later known as class WP/P (for prototype) had conical casings over the smokebox door with a smaller opening section to access the smokebox door. This made them more closely resemble the New Haven I-5 "Shoreliner" locomotives, and even more the 1943 New South Wales streamlined C38 class which had many features in common.

 

Three hundred locomotives were built in 1949, 100 from Baldwin, 80 from Canadian, and 120 from Montreal. Canadian later supplied another 120 as aid under the Colombo plan in 1955-56.

 

Sixty more came from European builders in 1957-59 with lower numbers starting at 7000. All the remainder in block ending at 7754 in 1966 were built at Chiittaranjan in India.

 

The WP was the heavier of the two standard Pacific designs. The lighter was class WL which had a smaller boiler and smaller cylinders and was not streamlined. these were numbered 15000 to 15009, 15014 to 15107. These were built from 1955 to 1968. The original 10 were at first numbered 7785 to 7794, just above the WP class.

 

Peter

 

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, December 10, 2018 5:55 PM

Thanks for all this M636C, Peter. Great information. 

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