1955 CIMCO News

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1955 CIMCO News
Posted by wanswheel on Monday, February 12, 2018 1:11 AM
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Posted by Penny Trains on Monday, February 12, 2018 6:25 PM

Really great stuff!  Big Smile Thanks for posting it!  Big Smile

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, February 12, 2018 6:57 PM

Those young Mr. Lincoln paintings were absolutely charming!  I don't know how you find this stuff Wanswheel, but thanks so much for posting it!

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, February 12, 2018 10:02 PM

A beautiful and meaningful tribute by The Chicago and Illinois Midland.

What a class act from the railroad. A far departure from the nonsense we are seeing and hearing today, ...revisionist history, dishonouring the past, identity politics all designed to tear a country apart. Same BS is going on up here, so don't feel like it's just you.

Investor groups, hedge funds, crony capitalists, stacked boards would not allow such a waste of precious stockholders monies, which of course is just them by a huge majority.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 11:16 AM

Hey Miningman, I think the "Same BS..." is going on over all of Western Civilization!  I was on You Tube several weeks back and ran into a video done by Swedish patriots decrying the revisonism and denigration of their own country's history!  And amazingly, they did it in English!  Maybe just to let us know we're not alone in our frustration?  

I have no way of knowing for sure, but I don't think this was a far-right or neo-fascist bunch, the only flag they showed was the Swedish flag, and they didn't denigrate anyones race, creed, or religion.

A couple of 'em had beards like Vikings too!  Cool!  I wish I could grow one like that!

I'm not one for believing in multi-national grand conspiracies, but these attacks on Western Civ really make me wonder.

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Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 11:43 AM

Thanks for favorable reviews. Lincoln's Birthday was a holiday all the years of my youth, of course as was Washington's. Presidents Day certainly wasn't on the Midland's Lincoln calendars. Probably some of the old folks who saw those calendars current in the 1930s remembered liking Abe like I remember liking Ike. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 3:54 PM

Wanswheel, If there were people living in the 1930's who remembered President Lincoln it wouldn't surprise me at all.  The last Civil War veterans passed away in 1959, by the way.

A few years back I read a story by a veteran journalist, don't remember who, who said that as a senior in high school back in the Thirties, and working on the high school paper, he was given the opportunity to interview a Union Army veteran who'd fought at the Battle of Gettysburg and then was part of the military contingent at the Gettysburg National Cemetery when Lincoln gave the "Gettysburg Address."

Well, he said he was quite nervous on meeting the old man, and the old vet saw it and asked him why.  When he explained why, the old man said "Ah, I understand youngster, I understand completely.  I felt the same way when I was your age and met a man who was with General Washington at Yorktown!"

Amazing, isn't it?  Also goes to show you this country isn't quite as old as we think it is!

Here's another great story from here in the Richmond VA area.

There was an article in the local paper by a gent who was a World War Two US Navy vet, he served in the Pacific and saw it all.  When he returned from the war the family threw a big "Welcome Home!" party for him and all his relatives were there, including an elderly great-aunt who as a young girl had lived through the Civil War.

He was describing the battles to everyone, especially the kamikaze atttacks and how terrifying they were.  The old woman looked him in the eye and said "Boy, I'm sure that's true, very true.  But you never saw a cavalry charge!"

Isn't that something?

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 4:38 PM

Firelock76
... the old man said "Ah, I understand youngster, I understand completely. I felt the same way when I was your age and met a man who was with General Washington at Yorktown!" Amazing, isn't it?

Also goes to show you this country isn't quite as old as we think it is!

Oh, I can do better than that.  Much better than that.  Perhaps you can still meet 'em...

<cues Mike with the wanslight> look up President Tyler's grandsons, Lyon and Harrison Ruffin (the latter born the same year as my father).

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 6:52 PM

Oh, here's a bit of real trivia for you!

Guess what former US president was buried by a foreign government with full presidential honors, and a foreign flag draped over his coffin? Give up?  OK

John Tyler!  Former President Tyler, a Virginian, was a supporter of that state's secession 1n 1861.  He was even elected to the Confederate Congress, but died before he could serve his term.

He was buried with full honors by the government of the Confederate States of America.  Now some might argue whether the CSA was a foreign government, but THEY considered themselves as such, and at any rate the US government certainly wasn't going to extend any honors to a secessionist, especially one in enemy territory.

Somethin', huh?

 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 7:56 PM

Umm, seeing as how I'm only 48 this may be a bit hard to believe.  But nonetheless my paternal grandfather was alive during the civil war.  I was born in 1969 but my dad was born in 1902.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 9:08 PM

Yep, this is a young country still, by any estimation!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 10:52 PM

...and then there was (the original birther movement) Chester Arthur ...'nuff said. Vermont, Quebec, drunk surveyors, middle name Abel  or Alan, one born and died Vermont very young, the other assuming his identity? what's the diff? 

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 7:19 AM

Australia was settled in 1788, pretty much as a result of the loss of the American colonies in 1776 and subsequently.

My paternal grandfather was born in Aberdeen in 1865. He came to Australia for the 1888 Centennial. He was a cyclist and won a six day indoor cycle race held inside the Exhibition Buildings in Melbourne. In those days a bicycle meant a Penny Farthing (the sizes of wheels looking like the largest and smallest British copper coins). I imagine the prize was substantial, so he asked his girlfriend to join him and he had a long career in the insurance industry. I remember him as an old man with a heavy Scots accent and a sense of humour (I was born in 1948, and "old Sam" died in 1950. There is a Kodachrome slide of us standing together outside his home).

My father was born in 1906. His next older brother was on board a troopship in Sydney Harbour in 1918 when the Armistice was declared. My father served in Egypt, Palestine, New Guinea and Borneo during the second World War.

I celebrated the Bicentennial of Australian settlement  aboard the Seventh Fleet flagship "Blue Ridge" in Sydney Harbour as a guest of the US Navy, 100 years after my Grandfather's bicycle race...   and that was thirty years ago now.

Since we had neither a revolution nor a civil war, we have no figures equivalent to Washington or Lincoln. I've visited Mount Vernon and Gettysburg, of course.

The person probably nearest to Washington in Australian history would be a military governor Lachlan Macquarie who built the first permanent roads and official buildings.

I think Australians are even more sceptical of their politicians than Americans and fewer are seen as heroic.

 

Peter

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 10:17 AM

Firelock76

Oh, here's a bit of real trivia for you!

Guess what former US president was buried by a foreign government with full presidential honors, and a foreign flag draped over his coffin? Give up?  OK

John Tyler!  Former President Tyler, a Virginian, was a supporter of that state's secession 1n 1861.  He was even elected to the Confederate Congress, but died before he could serve his term.

He was buried with full honors by the government of the Confederate States of America.  Now some might argue whether the CSA was a foreign government, but THEY considered themselves as such, and at any rate the US government certainly wasn't going to extend any honors to a secessionist, especially one in enemy territory.

Somethin', huh?

I would hardly considered the rebel government to be foreign.  It would best be classified under Article 3, Section 3 of the Constitution of the United States.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 11:00 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
I would have hardly considered the rebel government to be foreign.

But all that really mattered was that some other government extend the CSA diplomatic recognition, and I think there was some intensive diplomatic action, much of it a losing action for the Union government through most of 1862, to keep some European power or other from doing so.  Several professors at my foreign-policy school went carefully into how brilliant Lincoln's handling of the Emancipation Proclamation from September 1862 on was in preventing a British government from recognizing the Confederacy diplomatically (that recognition being at least in partial revenge perhaps for the French having done the same for the nascent United States during the Revolution).  Personally I think Britain was very close to recognizing the CSA in at least a form that would let the Laird rams loose on the blockade; a free commerce with Britain both ways might well have led to a much more protracted war or a separate peace, with no guarantee that Union victories could overcome the effect of British aid and passive, If not active, naval support.

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Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 1:15 PM

 

 

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, February 15, 2018 1:28 AM
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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, February 17, 2018 3:56 PM

Hmm, let me see here.  OK, got it, Article Three, Section Three...

"Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on confession in open Court."

"The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason, shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted."

Interesting, except after the Civil War no-one was tried and convicted of treason.

Maybe we whould look at the "foreign government" thing the way Union general Benjamin Butler did.  When he was commanding Fort Monroe on the Virginia penninsula a number of escaped slaves made their way to the fort for refuge with the Union forces there.  Some Confederate officials made a call on General Butler demanding return of the slaves per the requirements of the Fugitive Slave Act.  Ol' Ben said, in so many words, "Nothing doing!  When you gents seceded and formed your own country and government you removed yourselves from any provisions of United States law!  So, if you want to be treated as an independent nation, I'm more than happy to oblige you!"

It goes without saying Ben Butler being a Massachusetts man and a pretty sharp lawyer was a staunch Abolitionist as well.  Not much of a general, but in his own profession, a darn good lawyer.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, February 17, 2018 6:15 PM

Perfect answer from General Butler...kind of like checkmate on the chessboard...thats it, Irrefutable. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, February 17, 2018 6:52 PM

Yes, I believe he called it "one of the infamicities (sp?) of the war, that at least they were taken at their word."  Hillarious!  I love Butler!  Big Smile

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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