Train pictures of Hudson NY during steam era!

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Train pictures of Hudson NY during steam era!
Posted by wall st on Monday, June 19, 2017 12:33 PM

I have been searching for about 3 years and have been surprised how hard. My title is wall st in this community... I will gladely pay for any! TY

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Posted by ndbprr on Sunday, June 25, 2017 11:41 AM

I just tried a google search for New York Central Hudson New York and there are at least several hundred on the internet.  Don't ubderstand the problem of finding any pictures.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, June 25, 2017 6:26 PM

I believe he's talking about Hudson, New York which is on the New York Central main between New York City and Albany in the Hudson River Valley.  If You search for

ndbprr
New York Central Hudson New York
you're mostly going to get photos of 4-6-4's whereas he's looking for photos of hudsons, mohawks and the like running through his home town, of which there don't seem to be very many in existence.

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, June 25, 2017 7:25 PM

I tried looking for him myself and didn't have any luck.  He may want to try postcard or other ephemera dealers or a New York Central historical society, I'm sure there must be one.

He may also want to check if there's a local historical society, either the town of Hudson or Columbia County, they may have a photo archive.  The only photo's I've been able to find for Hudson NY are all contemporary.

Good luck, Wall St.!

Wall St., I just tought of something else.  If there's a Barnes and Noble or Books-A-Million in your area see if they carry the "Maine Antiques Digest."  It's a newspaper format antiques journal and lists upcoming antique shows of various types around the areas east of the Mississippi, especially the Northeast.  You best bet to find what you're looking for may come from shows that postcard and ephemera dealers display at.  "M.A.D." also carries ads from various antique dealers as well.

Again, good luck! 

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Posted by wanswheel on Monday, June 26, 2017 11:15 AM

Excerpt from Rand McNally & Co’s Handy Guide to the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains

https://archive.org/stream/rand09inge#page/n5/mode/2up

The City of Hudson. — Hudson is a town of 10,000 people crowning a bold bluff on the eastern shore. It has a curious history, quite different from that of most of the valley towns.

Dutch and English farmers and fishermen were settled all along these hill-slopes, from the earliest times, as tenants of the lower manor of the patroonery of the Van Rensselaers, but nothing in the shape of a village arose until 1783, when a purchase of lands was made by a company of merchants from Massachusetts and Rhode Island for the purpose of pursuing the whaling business, since during the Revolution the whale fisheries of Nantucket were broken up by the English. Settlers arrived at once, and were so numerous and influential that in April, 1785, the town was incorporated as a city called Hudson, the third city in the State, and having much wider limits than at present. This name was peculiarly apt, because here, or very near here, Henry Hudson ended the voyage of the Half Moon, and upon his return from his farther boat voyage halted for two days while he stored his vessel with wood and water and bade a ceremonious farewell to the natives, who had treated him with the greatest cordiality. This locality* was therefore peculiarly identified with the navigator.

*It should be mentioned, however, that the best historians do not now accept this claim, but assert that the real place was higher up; some say in the mouth of Kinderhook, or Stockport, Creek, and others near Schodack.

The city stands at the head of ship navigation — a fact which had recommended it to the choice of its commercial promoters; and preparations were at once made for sending out whaling-ships. Their early voyages were very successful, and reminders of this adventurous and almost forgotten commerce may be seen in the city to-day, as when, for example, the stranger comes upon a whale's jaw standing as a tall sign-post in the main street. A large trade was done with New York, Boston, and Providence, and Southern ports, principally with Charleston, S.C., in provisions and general produce, bringing in return cargoes of rice and cotton, sugar, rum, and molasses. In 1790 the city was made a port of entry, and with the growth of its commerce it bade fair to become the second city in the State. Another natural and important factor of growth was its ship-yards. Ship-building was carried on so extensively that at one time more vessels were owned in the city of Hudson than in the city of New York. During the Revolution in France, and the War of 1812 at home, many of the vessels owned in Hudson were employed in the carrying trade, and several of these were captured or destroyed by the French and English, several were lost by shipwreck, and when steam  navigation became a certainty the decline of the commercial prosperity of the city was complete. "In 1815," says an authority, "the city was closed as a port of entry; an effort to revive the whaling interests was made, but with indifferent success, and in 1845 the last ship engaged in the business was sold." The high hopes of Hudson were then quenched; but this was due not to the fact that the expectations were replaced — for under the conditions of transportation which obtained at the time when the town was founded the town at the head of navigation was in the best commercial position — but because, with the rise of steamboats and railroads — new conditions — the city at the mouth of the river had so much advantage.

Hudson stands upon a slate bluff which rises abruptly from the river, and from whose brow, now a public promenade, a very wide and pleasurable view of the river is presented. It is sixty feet above the beach, and across the wide moat of the Hudson the long front of the Catskills rises like some Titanic fortification.

This bluff is the end of a narrow ridge which slopes gradually upward for a mile and a-half to Prospect Hill, the high, rounded eminence behind the town. Warren Street, the main thoroughfare, extends along the crest of this ridge, with the neighboring streets sloping downward on each side. The town is very compactly built, its streets are deeply shaded, and many of its houses are old and excellent; the best of them cluster about the pretty square, with its noble trees, in front of the portico of the court house.

The city has electric cars, steam ferries to Athens and Catskill (see p.185), and a small steamboat now plies between Hudson and Albany. The State Reformatory for Women is conspicuous upon a green knoll south of the city.

Columbia County and its little capital boast of many citizens of consequence in the past as well as the present. President Martin Van Buren lived here as a young man, and passed his declining years near by. Samuel J. Tilden spent his boyhood in this vicinity, and is buried at New Lebanon, not far away. Here, in the early decades of this century, were living such prominent men as the once famous orator Elisha Williams, and the lawyers Ambrose Spencer, William Van Ness, Thomas P. Grosvenor, Jacob R. Van Rensselaer, Col. Elisha Jenkins, and others.

In the days when these men were young and fashionable, they would go in midsummer to the Columbia White Sulphur Springs, four miles east of the city, where all the world made merry, as now they do at Saratoga. A hotel still opens its doors, and a few lovers of the old resort annually assemble there to preserve the traditions; but these springs are rarely set down in the lists of fashion's watering-places.

Not far distant, and a station on the Boston & Albany branch road, is the quaint and historic village of Claverack, now known principally as the seat of "Claverack College," a prosperous school of wide repute for both sexes.

"The handsome and substantial college buildings, surrounded by beautiful and well-shaded lawns, and commanding most charming views of the romantic scenery in which the neighborhood abounds, are the features of the village. The old Dutch church, with its staring date of 1767 on its western side, shines out in old-fashioned red among the towering oaks that keep ward over it and its adjoining cemetery. On the opposite crest is 'Fairview,' the stately mansion built by the late Doctor Flack, who was the founder of the college, and its president for more than thirty years. Down the village street are the residences of the descendants of the Muhlers, the Ostranders, and the Van Rensselaers, and in a quaint old yellow brick, dormer-windowed house are to be seen the lares and penates of Gen. James Watson and other distinguished Webbs. The 'Spook Rock,' in a shady swirl of the Claverack Creek, is visited on moonlight nights by the neighboring swains and their sweethearts, who linger to see it turn in its shiny bed when it hears the institute bell."

The distance from Hudson to the Berkshire Hills is only thirty miles, and this way comes a large part of the travel between that favorite part of Massachusetts and the metropolis. Many New Yorkers, sending their horses and carriages up by boat, drive over from here. Perhaps more would do so if the excellence of the roads and the varied and unsuspected beauty of the scenery in this neighborhood were more widely understood. From some of the higher points on the country roads, the hills of Berkshire, the Taghkanick, and even the Green Mountains, are visible, as well as the ever-present Catskills. Beautiful glens and quaint hamlets abound, reminding one of the better-known but no worthier region about Tarrytown.

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Posted by wall st on Monday, June 26, 2017 12:33 PM

This was just great but pictures of steam going through Hudson ny-station area my goal-TY Wallst

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Posted by wall st on Monday, June 26, 2017 12:36 PM

Thanks for ur reply-U were totally correct-re-Hudson... wall st ps; will keep looking!...

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, June 26, 2017 1:50 PM

Here's what you get by selectively quoting

"hudson ny" steam

and choosing images gets you a link to a postcard museum with a photo of NYC 5310 at Hudson.

www.ebpm.com/rr/bigpix/fan_rrsteam009.html

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Posted by wanswheel on Monday, June 26, 2017 3:13 PM

There’s a little photo of a "4-6-2 Pacific engine, built in 1911 (Baldwin Locomotive Works) arriving in Hudson, 1920s” in Columbia County History & Heritage magazine, Fall 2002, page 8.

http://www.cchsny.org/uploads/3/2/1/7/32173371/cchh_fall_2002.pdf

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, June 26, 2017 9:00 PM

Try this outfit and keep your fingers crossed...

www.cardcow.com

 

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Posted by wall st on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 7:08 AM

Thank You!!! wall st

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Posted by wall st on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 11:45 AM

T Y, I will... wall st

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Posted by wall st on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 11:47 AM

thanks guys!-wall st

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 7:45 PM

You're welcome!  Best of luck but remember, sometimes it's the "thrill of the hunt" that's the real fun!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 7:02 PM

Found another outfit, www.papermaniaplus.com

They're in Hartford CT and specialize in ephemera shows.  I don't know where you live in New York (I assume you're in NY!) but if you're in the Hudson Valley I don't think Hartford's too long a drive.

www.maineantiquedigest.com has a list of shows, but you've got your work cut out for you checking it, they don't give locations on the website, you've got to click on the show announcements individually.  Ouch.  Hope you're patient!

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Posted by wall st on Thursday, June 29, 2017 7:38 AM

Thanks again! I will give a go... Live on Long Island- wall st

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, June 29, 2017 5:50 PM

Glad I and the others could help!  I'll tell you, I'm sure you've got a lot of lookin' ahead of you but let me tell you when you score, it'll really make your day!

Again, best of luck!

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Posted by wall st on Monday, July 03, 2017 11:05 AM

Because u sent me this, I contacted them and they are sure they have more of train action in Hudson! Will get back to me later in week. Wanted to update and say thanks again- been a long effort! Wallst-Happy 4th too! :)

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, July 03, 2017 4:56 PM

That's great!  Glad it's working out for you!

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