Need info on B&O and CB&Q steam

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Need info on B&O and CB&Q steam
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 22, 2004 6:07 AM
I bought two slides yesterday and I would like to get information and/or photos of both of them.

The first one is of Chicago Burlington & Quincy 4-6-4 Hudson #4000, the other is of Baltimore & Ohio 2-8-2 Mikado #4434.

Thanks for any info[:)]
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, February 22, 2004 6:52 AM
Mark,

B&O 4434 was built by Baldwin in March 1921 b/n 54681, as a B&O class Q-4 Mikado. It had 26x32 cylinders, 64" drivers, 220 lbf per sq in pressure, weighed 327 000 lbs and had a tractive effort of 63200 lbf. It was renumbered 421 in 1957 and was retired in November 1959. The locomotive was very similar to the USRA standard light Mikado, (B&O Q-3) but had a higher pressure and cylinders with 2 inches longer stroke.

Sorry, can't help with CB&Q 4000, although I seem to recall (if I'm thinking of the right engine) that it was fitted with a streamlined shroud to act as protection power for Zephyrs, named "Aeolus" ("God of the Winds"). There is a story that the men called it "Big Alice the Goon", possibly a comment on its appearance.

By the way, one of my school friends really was called Dougal, so I don't have any problems with the name.

Peter
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 22, 2004 9:17 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by M636C

Mark,

B&O 4434 was built by Baldwin in March 1921 b/n 54681, as a B&O class Q-4 Mikado. It had 26x32 cylinders, 64" drivers, 220 lbf per sq in pressure, weighed 327 000 lbs and had a tractive effort of 63200 lbf. It was renumbered 421 in 1957 and was retired in November 1959. The locomotive was very similar to the USRA standard light Mikado, (B&O Q-3) but had a higher pressure and cylinders with 2 inches longer stroke.

Sorry, can't help with CB&Q 4000, although I seem to recall (if I'm thinking of the right engine) that it was fitted with a streamlined shroud to act as protection power for Zephyrs, named "Aeolus" ("God of the Winds"). There is a story that the men called it "Big Alice the Goon", possibly a comment on its appearance.

By the way, one of my school friends really was called Dougal, so I don't have any problems with the name.

Peter


The CB&Q shot was taken in 1956 in Galesburg, Ill. The engine looks VERY clean and isn't shrouded. Maybe they just took the shrouding off.
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Posted by gbrewer on Sunday, February 22, 2004 4:27 PM
From Surviving steam locomotive: http://www.steamlocomotive.com/lists/

4000 (3002) S-4A 4-6-4 4'-8½" CB&Q Copeland Park, LaCrosse, WI display Named Aeolus

I took a picture of it myself in Galesburg back in the late '50s.
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, February 22, 2004 4:32 PM
Mark,
Again, assuming I'm thinking of the right locomotive, it was de-shrouded fairly soon after WW II, because it was very rarely used on streamlined trains. The shroud was stainless steel with a band of fluting to match the cars, a bit like the Reading engines for the "Crusader", but it did get in the way of maintenance. Once they had E-7s, the failure rate was small enough to ignore and there were spare diesels anyway.

Peter
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Posted by M636C on Friday, March 19, 2004 11:11 PM
Mark,

Here is a link to a photo of CB&Q 4000 with shrouding!

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/cbq4000.jpg

There was a link to this site on the MR forum.

Peter
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 20, 2004 10:33 PM
The Q shrouded several of its S-4 class Hudsons with stainless steel, but it was all taken off in 1942 when the Burlington had ordered the 12 E-5's for backup Zephyr power.

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